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The Crown Jewels

The Danish crown jewels, the symbols of the monarchy, consist of the crown, the sceptre (symbolising supreme authority), the orb(vault of heaven and earth), the sword of state and the ampulla. The oldest of these is Christian III's sword of state from 1551.

Christian IV's crown of gold, enamel, diamonds and pearls, created 1595-1596 by Dirich Fyring in Odense  
Christian IV's crown of gold, enamel, diamonds and pearls, created 1595-1596 by Dirich Fyring in Odense.

Further elements in the regalia are the chains and insignia of the Order of the Elephant and the Order of Dannebrog, which the monarch wears on special occasions. Since c. 1680 the crown jewels have been kept in Rosenborg Palace in Copenhagen.

The regalia were worn at the coronation of the elective monarchs, when the clergy and nobility placed the crown on the king's head. After the introduction of absolutism in 1660 the crowning of the king was replaced by anointment, for which the king arrived in the church wearing the crown and was consecrated to his calling by being anointed with oil.

 

Christian V's crown, created 1670-1671 by Paul Kurtz in Copenhagen after a French model. For the anointing of Christian V, a new crown was made along with a throne of narwhal teeth (the unicorn's horn) and three silver lions. With the 1849 Constitution anointing was discontinued and since the crown jewels have only been used on the occasion of the monarch's castrum doloris when the crown is placed on the coffin and the other regalia laid at its foot, guarded by the three lions.

 Frederik III's ampulla used at the coronation in 1648 and at the anointing of the absolute monarchs. The ampulla is 4.9 cm high.

 

Christian V's crown, created 1670-1671 by Paul Kurtz in Copenhagen after a French model.

 

 

 

 

Frederik III's ampulla used at the coronation in 1648 and at the anointing of the absolute monarchs. The ampulla is 4.9 cm high.

 

 

 

 

Jørgen Hein, Gyldendal Leksikon