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Martin Nyrop

Martin Nyrop, 1849-1921, is one of the most important representatives of the so-called national romantic tendency in historicist architecture.

Martin NyropHe found his inspiration both in North Italian architecture and old Scandinavian architectural styles, which were reinterpreted to form a very individualistic idiom with emphasis on good workmanship and the textural qualities of the material.

Nyrop was a determined opponent of the stuccoed architecture that was so much in vogue at the time, and instead he fought for the use of "honest and genuine" materials such as bricks, wood and slates.

Among Nyrop's major works are Bispebjerg Hospital (1907-18) and Eliaskirken in Vesterbro (1905-08), while his greatest achievement is Copenhagen City Hall (1892-1905), in which Nordic and southern European impulses, not least from the City Hall in Siena, have been adapted with great personal vitality to produce a festive, popular and easily grasped building, which both inside and outside reflects Nyrop's lively imagination and vibrant delight in colour. 
 

Elisabeth Buchwald, Gyldendal Leksikon

Copenhagen city hall

The city hall tower is at 105.6 metres one of the tallest buildings in Copenhagen.

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