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Recipes: Baking that dark, sour bread (Rugbrød)

The Danes are world famous for their love of rugbrød. This particular kind of nutritional brown rye bread can be found in all supermarkets and local bakeries across Denmark. What makes this bread so special is that it’s very low in fat, contains no oil or sugar and is rich in whole grain and dietary fibre. It is considered by many Danes as a much healthy alternative to whiter types of bread.

This takes time and dedication, but once you’re hooked, you’re most likely going to keep baking.

Making a rye bread sour dough starter
250 gram of rye flour
4 deciliters of water
Generous pinch of salt
2 tablespoons of honey
2 tablespoons of yogurt

Mix the ingredients to a mud-like consistency in a bowl. Cling film but punch some holes in the film, so that the sour dough can breathe. Leave for 2 days, on the third day, put some extra rye flour ad water in, and leave for a day or two, until it starts bubbling. Now it’s ready. You can store sourdoughs in the fridge for up to two weeks or more. To keep them alive give them a little fresh rye or wheat flour once in a while.

Rye bread with seeds (2 breads of 1 kg)

For the first day:
500 grams of sour dough
250 grams of rye grains
50 grams of linseed
150 grams of wheat flour
5 deciliters of lukewarm water
1 tablespoon of salt
1 ½ tablespoon of honey

For the second day:
1100 grams of rye flour
3 tablespoons of salt
1 ½ tablespoons of honey
9 deciliters of water
A little corn oil for the baking tins

On day one stir the first-day ingredients together, leave for next day under a wet cloth. On the second day, take the dough from the previous day and knead together with second batch of ingredients for 10 minutes. Take away 500 grams of sour dough for next time you’re baking, put in a plastic container in the fridge.

Rub a little oil in two large baking tins and pour in the dough that should be the thickness of heavy mud. Leave to rise for 4 – 6 hours and bake at 170 degrees for 1 hour ad 45 minutes. Then take out of tins and bake for another fifteen minutes. Let cool completely before cutting in thin slices of approx 4-8 millimeters.

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